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Het grote kantoortaboe: toegeven dat je je verveelt

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Burn-outs door te hard werken kennen we inmiddels wel. Maar verveling op kantoor? Daar praten we net zo lief niet over.

Are you bored at work? Do you stare blankly at your screen wondering what to do with the rest of your day? No doubt, you are a victim of “boreout,” which describes persistent boredom and disengagement in your work.

What causes this listlessness and how can you solve it? Frédéric Méduin, a physician and occupational therapist, offers some insight.

Many situations can lead to boredom at work. The first is an insufficient workload, both in terms of quality and quantity. Overly repetitive tasks can be the source of boreout, even when they are time-consuming.

Company reorganizations or a transfer to a new unit can also give rise to this feeling because not all workers adapt easily to new workplace configurations.

It’s also true that people are rarely equal in terms of job efficiency. Even with similar qualifications and experience, no two people are going to achieve the same results in the same amount of time. So it’s inevitable that certain people will become bored more quickly.

Boreout is also linked to inadequate social interaction. A job itself may be interesting, but lack of engagement with co-workers or geographic isolation, such as working at home, can be sources of boredom and frustration.

People whose skills and expertise aren’t being sufficiently tapped are most at-risk of this toxic office ailment. Hyperactive adults also experience this phenomenon at a disproportionate rate, even though they often are deeply involved with their work.

It can happen even when their qualifications and workload are in sync. They often need to compensate for workplace boredom by adding professional side projects or investing themselves more in personal activities.

Read the full article: Meet “Boreout”, Burnouts blasé cousin
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