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Blackberry, Powerbook: iemand heeft die namen ooit bedacht. Hij dus

Foto ANP

David Placek krijgt zo 100.000 dollar om een naam voor een product te verzinnen. Hij heeft dan ook al flink wat successen bedacht: de Blackberry, Pentium (van Intel), Powerbook van Apple. Maar ook een nederig product als de Swiffer werd door hem van een naam voorzien.

The Brand Man, How David Placek Names Things You Want To Buy

He’s coined everything from the PowerBook to Blackberry to your kitchen mop. There’s a method to his magic.

When David Placek decided to call Intel’s processor “Pentium” he put a name on a new cornerstone in the way the world works. When he called a new Subaru car “Outback,” he gave life to a personal fantasy shared across the globe. And when he came up with the “Blackberry,” he aimed for a mixture of fun and power.

The man who invents names for the world’s biggest brands did his best to explain to Calcalist how the magic is done, and why is it worth to pay him a $100,000 for a name alone.

One of his best-known breakthroughs happened when one of the members of the creative think-tank stood up and wrote on the board with a red marker, Strawberry. Under it he wrote “it’s healthy, colorful, ‘berry’ is fun.” A few minutes later, another employee said Strawberry was too slow a word for such a useful product. Then, a third employee went to the board and wrote with a black marker Blackberry, and under it “Black, industrial, berry is fun.”

This was when David Placek understood that his company had survived yet another challenge and found the right name for an innovative new phone that allowed the easy sending of emails. The year was 1999, and soon after the name Blackberry was a ringing phenomenon in the business world.

It is no surprise that Placek considers Blackberry one of the biggest…

Read the full article: The Brand Man, How David Placek Names Things You Want To Buy

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